Cornwall’s best surfing beaches

Visiting Cornwall for a surf vacation? This pick of the best beaches will help you suss out where to go so you make the most of your holiday, wherever you decide to surf.

 

Sennen

©http://www.sennenheights.co.uk/

  1. Sennen

Just North of Land’s End, Sennen is famed for producing huge (and definitely not surf-able) waves when stormy.  In more normal climes, Sennen is well regarded by local surfers; the bay is spacious and very consistent and peaky when the wind is offshore on a medium swell.

 

Fistral

© Edge of the Map

  1. Fistral

Probably the most well-known surfing beach in the UK, Fistral is generally pretty consistent with the strength of its waves and will draw crowds in all year around; the south end of the beach is sheltered from South Westerly winds and prefers higher tides. Multiple surf schools around the area as well as beach bars and shops mean there’s something to do no matter how long you want to stick around for.

 

perran

©http://www.perranporthslsc.org.uk/

  1. Perranporth

Perranporth is probably the longest beach on this list, so generally you’ll always find something to surf along the length of it. Droskyn Point towards the south is a favoured spot of locals and it’ll show on the weekends, just be aware of the riptide!

 

Sandymouth

©http://www.sandymouth.com/

  1. Sandymouth

Just a little north of Bude Sandymouth provides consistent, clean surf at low tides. It’s popular with locals and is often popular when other nearby beaches are busier.  A fun beach break close to Bude Holiday Resort makes this beach an ideal excuse for a glamping/Surfing weekend.

 

Porthleven

© Carvemag.com

  1. Porthleven

For the more experienced, the rocky-reef break here frequently draws in world-class waves and will always be busy for it. Dangerous at both low and high tides this is a spot most people prefer to watch rather than surf, especially seeing as the harbour area is packed with cosy places to survey from.

 

widemouth

©http://www.surfcom.co.uk/

  1. Widemouth Bay

Popular for surfers of any skill level, Widemouth Bay is reliably consistent and always has something to ride. Popular with the nearby surf schools and busy in the summer its combination of reef and beach breaks mean you can really challenge yourself if you want too. If you’re looking for a base to scope out all the nearby beaches Widemouth Fields offers an ideal outpost.

 

portreath

©Toms Photos

  1. Portreath

The harbour wall here provides a very nice sheltered area to surf from, popular with the body boarding crowd it offers quite a powerful swell that is generally preferred by more experienced surfers. You’ll find the best water movement when the tide is rising.

 

watergate

© Beyond the Lens Images

  1. Watergate Bay

Newquay’s other world famous beach Watergate Bay offers long stretches of fun beach breaks and is popular with kite surfers. The beach is very well equipped with surf shops and schools, bars, bistros and restaurants. Two convenient car parks nearby mean access is easy and it’s also very close to Newquay View Resort for those eager to book a reasonably priced surfer’s getaway: camping or caravan holidaying, or glamping.

 

Chapel Porth

© Edge of the Map

  1. Chapel Porth

Just south of St. Agnes is Chapel Porth which offers a fast and hollow beach break. This beach is probably best left for the more experienced. It’s a bit hidden away but on a good day it will prove itself to be very consistent. At high tide the beach all but disappears and leaves you with a stunning view from the National Trust car park next to it.

 

gwithian

© Saltshots.com

  1. Gwithian

A nice bit of beach that’s excellent for beginners, Gwithian has a steady beach break and is more sheltered along the south. The surf here seems to be best around low to middle tide height, nearby are a few surf schools and amenities.

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